Nature Tour | Places to visit

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Kumana National Park
Uda Walawe National Park
Wilpattu National Park
Horton Plains National Park
Yala National Park
Botanical Gardens
Tea Country
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Kumana National Park

Situated on the border of the Yala National Park, Kumana renowned for its avifauna, especially its large flocks of migratory water fowl and wading birds. 255 species of birds have been recorded at the Kumana Bird Sanctuary, with rare species such as the black-necked stork, the lesser adjuant, Eurasian spoonbill and the great thick-knee being breeding inhabitants.

Uda Walawe National Park

The third most visited National Park in the island, Udawalawe is a myriad of interesting flora and fauna due to the presence of the Udawalawe reservoir on the Walawe river, the surrounding marshes, forests and grasslands. Another important habitat for the elephant (a herd of about 250 is believed to be permanently resident) and a recorded number of 12 amphibian species, 21 species of fish, 33 reptiles, 184 species of birds and 43 mammals.

Wilpattu National Park

Aptly named due to the existence of numerous ‘ willus’ or natural basins that fill with rainwater, Wilpattu is situated in the Northwest coast, lowland, dry zone. One of the largest and oldest National Parks, Wilpattu is renowned for its leopard population along with 31 species of mammals and an abundance of wetland bird speciaes.

Horton Plains National Park

Home to more than half of Sri Lanka’s vertebrates, half of the island’s endemic flowering plants and more than 34% of its endemic trees and shrubs, the Horton Plains is a mist shrouded and breathtaking wonder and ideal for trekking, hiking and camping. Added to the mystery and romance, one could enjoy the splendor of the leopard, the sambhur, the endemic purple-faced langur, the Sri Lanka bush warbler and the yellow-eared bulbul.

Yala National Park

The second largest national park in Sri Lanka, Yala is situated in the Southeast part of the island in the dry, semi-arid climate region, bordering the Indian Ocean. The number of mammals recorded at Yala is as high as 44 while it also boasts of one of the highest leopard densities in the world. None other than the majestic Sri Lankan elephant and the leopard, take pride of place at this amazing national park.

Botanical Gardens

A famous botanist once declared that Sri Lanka is simply one big botanical garden, nurtured by Nature itself. Yet when the British colonials arrived in Sri Lanka in the 19th century, they were determined to establish more gardens within this garden – man-made botanical gardens cloned from the mother Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in England. In 1821 on the site of a pleasure garden first created in about 1371 for the King of Kandy. The British established the gracious Royal Botanic Gardens of Peradeniya. Another garden was set up in the hill country, established in 1861 at Hakgala south of Nuwara Eliya. And in 1876, yet another garden was established, this time in the lowlands at Henarathgoda, the Gampaha Botanic Gardens, designated for the trial planting of the country’s first Rubber trees. Other private gardens such as the famous Lunuganga and “Brief”, designed by world-renowned architect Geoffrey Bawa and his brother landscape artist Bevis Bawa, bring to life the paradisiacal charm that is refreshingly Sri Lanka’s. Sri Lanka’s botanical gardens are a showcase of the country’s botanical treasures and are botanical gems deserving the same admiration and wonder as the country’s famed sapphires and emeralds.

Tea Country

While the winds of change blow softly but surely through the legendary rolling hills of Sri Lanka’s tea estates, the beautiful scenery that captivated Sir Thomas Lipton - who fell in love with the spectacular scenery around Dambatenne – still remains. From the highest spot in the region — a point known today as Lipton’s Seat — he would gaze over one of the most dramatic regions of the country, the seemingly endless hills and tumbling waterfalls giving way almost abruptly to the southern plains, which stretch as far as the eye can see, all the way to the coast. Centuries later, the enchantment of the tea country, its mystique and romance lives on. Hundreds of miles of green velvet smothers the mountainside, the soft mist settles to cloak the surroundings in romance and mystery and the quaint, little cottages beckon you with the tantalizing aromas of freshly brewed Ceylon tea.

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